Category: Change Management


Reflecting on Change Management + 2016 best practice

Think back to when you were a teenager. Would you have been excited about the future if your parents told you they were moving the family to a different city and you were leaving all your friends, switching schools and starting over…but they didn’t seem thrilled at the idea, couldn’t tell you why you were moving, or what the long-term prospects were? Would you have been able to see why the move was important to the whole family? Parents are the leaders of families, and we instinctively look to them for guidance. In this case, they set you up to be worried, upset and anxious from the start by not being effective sponsors of change.

A similar dynamic exists in organizations if leaders are ineffective change sponsors.

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What could business process mapping possibly have to do with enabling work?

Enabling work includes policy development, guidance creation, training, planning, strategy, and reporting functions, and other work which “enables” or “supports” the core business of a department. We typically think of business process mapping (BPM) as related to the core business, and not so much with the functions that support this business.

In fact, BPM and enabling work overlap in many ways. If you’re asking the question, you are definitely not alone. Indeed, you are part of a large majority of public sector workers.  By default, that makes my opinion quite unpopular and out of step with the norm.  But does that necessarily make it unfounded or irrelevant? read more

Tooling with IM Enablers

Thanks to the ARMA-NCR Board and IM Community for a fun and thought provoking discussion earlier this month.

We discussed specific change management and business analysis tools that can be used by business and IM folks alike.  With foundational elements like organizational change and business processes, it’s not surprising that we have so much in common.
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GCDOCS Architecture – All for One and One For All!

Change management best practice teaches us that lack of awareness is the primary source of resistance to organizational change. It seems like architects working on EDRMS or GCDOCS have to face this problem redoubled: first, they have to make their stakeholders aware of what they are attempting to design. But at a more fundamental level, they also need to confront the fact that information management itself is very often unaware of the scope of what it is asking of the organization. And it’s a big ask.

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How to Implement Lean Six Sigma in 5 (rather large but) Easy Steps

In my previous blog, we discussed the Lean approach to eliminating waste in work processes.  This conversation is extremely relevant and timely given the Government of Canada’s endorsement of Lean as the methodology of choice for streamlining work processes.  In fact many functional teams across Ottawa are already embarking on lean initiatives as part of their business improvement efforts, and/or in relation to Destination 2020 action plans. Now it’s time to discuss the Lean Six Sigma approach. read more

How to Implement Lean in 6 Easy Steps

Leaning processes are all about eliminating waste, and waste exists within all processes.  We all experience rework and lost time in our daily work, and there is a financial cost ($) and human cost (employee morale) associated with it. This is common knowledge.

What may not be as common is how to apply lean to your specific process.  Two questions immediately come to mind for me:  What are the main steps to take? And what are the key requirements for success?  I think that these questions are a good way to get the conversation started. read more

Define the future and Sponsor the transition

To lead organizations through constant change, the senior management team of 2015 must define the future and sponsor the transition.  In other words, they must connect ‘hard’ business strategy with ‘soft’ factors like employee engagement and culture. I’ve seen many management teams struggle to achieve the right balance.  With this in mind, I am offering five steps for consideration. read more