Category: Digital Transformation


A firsthand experience with Denmark’s eGovernment strategy

Lost in the blue water between Norway, Sweden and Germany, you’ll find a cluster of islands and a peninsula known as Denmark, but don’t be fooled, this country is anything but off the map. With over 5 million citizens, Denmark is currently ranked as the happiest country in the world by the UN in their World Happiness Report, where Canada is sixth on the list. Denmark seems to have a good understanding of how to please their citizens, so what can be contributing to this overwhelming happiness of citizens? I wondered if it could relate their public services, sustainability, or bicycle culture? read more

Process Mapping to Improve Organizational Performance (and your morning routine)

Casey is not a morning person. From the time Casey’s alarm goes off, to the point of arrival at work, it takes about 2 rushed and frantic hours, each and every day. Some mornings are slightly better, and some are slightly worse. But overall, Casey is not happy with his routine and wants to make a change.  The big question, is where to begin. (We can use Casey’s routine to instruct us on processes for organizational improvement – after all, improvements can be found everywhere)  read more

What could business process mapping possibly have to do with enabling work?

Enabling work includes policy development, guidance creation, training, planning, strategy, and reporting functions, and other work which “enables” or “supports” the core business of a department. We typically think of business process mapping (BPM) as related to the core business, and not so much with the functions that support this business.

In fact, BPM and enabling work overlap in many ways. If you’re asking the question, you are definitely not alone. Indeed, you are part of a large majority of public sector workers.  By default, that makes my opinion quite unpopular and out of step with the norm.  But does that necessarily make it unfounded or irrelevant? read more

Web renewal is about you too, not just your content

As a content strategist working on Canada.ca, I work with government departments who want to understand how the new site will support their content. They want to know for example which template to use, the best practices for writing page titles, or how to format lists.

Aside from these practical concerns, there’s an equally fundamental issue to consider as departments prepare for the move to a single federal government website. read more

6 things I learned from CanUX 2015

Last month, Systemscope was a proud sponsor of the CanUX conference – an “amazing showcase of modern experience design trends” held at the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau, Quebec.
As an attendee of the sold-out event – here are my key takeaways:

  1. Design is a big deal
  2. Belting out O’ Canada in public should be rewarded with beer
  3. Consider the Context– (I have a feeling this is going to get really important)
  4. Thinking like a user is NOT user research
  5. UX toolset needs to expand to measure the whole experience, not just the usability aspect
  6. UX matters, really, it does

read more

It’s time to think mobile first for government services and information

I’ve heard more than one government client say that he or she didn’t have the time or budget to think about the implications of mobile when developing online content. Getting approved content online in both official languages and in accordance with multiple TBS policies and standards was daunting enough, and it stretched staff and budgets. If considered at all, “mobile” was thought of in terms of mobile applications. read more

Define the future and Sponsor the transition

To lead organizations through constant change, the senior management team of 2015 must define the future and sponsor the transition.  In other words, they must connect ‘hard’ business strategy with ‘soft’ factors like employee engagement and culture. I’ve seen many management teams struggle to achieve the right balance.  With this in mind, I am offering five steps for consideration. read more